Free Online Kansas Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Ohio Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Minnesota Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Michigan Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Veridian Adds/Updates 116 Titles – January, 2022

Veridian Software has many clients with collections of digitized newspapers that can be searched for free. Over 50 million pages currently.

They power California, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Virginia,  Washington, and Wyoming state newspaper collections. And country-wide collections, such as Estonia, Israel, New Zealand, Singapore, and Switzerland.

Veridian is the name of the software and service package created by DL Consulting,  headquartered in Hamilton, New Zealand.

This past month, they have added or updated 116 titles from 9 collections and several different countries, including the U.S.

Here is the list of their collections that had additions and the date range available for that title. 

Catholic Research Resources Alliance – Catholic Research Resources Alliance      

Colorado State Library / Wyoming State Library – Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection      

Eastview – Hoji Shinbun Digital Collection      

Library of Virginia – Virginia Chronicle: Digital Newspaper Archive      

National Library of Israel – Israel National Library      

Palo Alto Unified School District – Paly Journalism Archive      

Purdue University – Purdue University Newspapers Collection      

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign – Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections      

  •  The Post (2-Jan-64 – 21-Aug-74)

Washington State Library – Washington Digital Newspapers      

Check out their website at Veridian Software to learn more about them. And as always, you can see all the free online newspaper links colledcted by The Ancestor Hunt  in Newspaper Links

Free Online Indiana Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Illinois Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

32 Ways to Find Ancestor Locations and Addresses

When researching our ancestors, one of our most important goals is to determine where they lived. This information is key to finding other aspects of their lives, whether they be local or state vital records or newspapers where there might be further information about them.

Most folks limit their search to the obvious repositories, whether online or not, focusing primarily on census records and city directories. There are many other ways to determine specifics about ancestor locations, including their specific addresses. Finding this other information also provides clues that help you to find further information about them.

Many of these listed source types should not stand alone as evidence of their residence, so you might want to check many of these sources to provide corroborating evidence.

I have put together a Quick Reference Guide that has 32 different ways and places where you can find their location information.

To obtain the one-page Quicksheet pdf for easy reference, you can download it by clicking on 32 Ways to Find Ancestor Locations and Addresses

For all the previously published Quick Reference Guides, click on QuickSheets

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Missouri Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Mississippi Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!