Free Online North Carolina Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online South Carolina Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Texas Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Oklahoma Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

The Easiest Way to Find Every Historical Newspaper in America

The fact is that all old newspapers ever published in the United States are not online. Much less than you might think.

So let’s just say for now that 15 to 30% of all U.S. newspaper pages have been digitized. Personally, I think that’s a very high number, but……

That leaves about 70-85% that are NOT online! Now, what the heck do we do? Offline research – that’s what. And the Library of Congress helps us out.

Below is a link to a QuickSheet that shows you how to find where almost all newspapers ever published in the U.S. are held – either online, in a library or archive, original newsprint, or microfilm. To obtain the two-page Quicksheet pdf for easy reference, you can view or download it by clicking on the link below.

The Easiest Way to Find Every Historical Newspaper in America

For all the previously published Quick Reference Guides, click on QuickSheets

Free Online Louisiana Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Alabama Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Almost 40,000 Free Online Historical U.S. Newspapers Now Available to Research – End of 2021

On this website, the first set of free online links to U.S. historical newspapers was published in February 2014. with about 10,000 titles. There have been at least two updates published each year since then. The final update of 2021 adds another 1,400 titles.

The grand total is 39,080 links to Historical American Newspapers that can be searched for Free Online. That is a four-fold increase in seven years!

More and more newspapers are being digitized and are being made available for all of us to research. Some are full-text searchable and others are browsable.

To search the new and updated links, choose your state link below and see all the newspapers that are available for you to research. Also included is the number oif titles digitized for each state.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Tennessee Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!

Free Online Arkansas Mortuary and Funeral Home Records

Mortuary and Funeral Home records are yet another little used resource by genealogy researchers.  They are difficult to obtain, especially in hard copy from the original funeral home.  You can contact them, but often, mortuaries went out of business, or were sold to another company. And many of the original records have been lost or destroyed.

Never fear though, there are a number of mortuary records that have been digitized and made available online.

Online record collections are available from subscription sites such as Ancestry.com and My Heritage .

But there are other state and local collections available as well, and some of them are indexes only (from ledger books). And some are free and available online!

Here are some articles that may entice you to research Mortuary and Funeral Home records:

Have you ever looked at a mortuary record? There is an abundance of great information available! Here is a list of some of the information on such a record, besides the brand and cost of the casket:

  • Name of informant and person paying for the service
  • Cause of death
  • Address of the deceased
  • Burial location “to be”
  • In some cases – the name of the father and mother
  • Name of attending physician as well as hospital or place of death
  • Date of birth
  • Date of death
  • Date of planned burial
  • Obituary from multiple newspapers
  • Occupation
  • Birth Place
  • Marital Status
  • Gender
  • Race
  • Plus much more

Below are links to collections that are online and available for free. Be aware that some collections have full mortuary records, some are glorified death indexes, and some are just indexes to the actual mortuary records.

Note 1: Many of the links listed below take you to a FamilySearch Collection of digital images. Near the bottom of the page under Film/Digital Notes is the name of each sub-collection. If there is a camera icon at the right of the name (in the Format column) then the collections’ images are browsable. If there is a camera with a key icon, it is only available at a Family History Center or affiliated library. If there is a film reel icon, then it is only available in microfilm format, not digital.

Good Luck and Happy Hunting!